Sweet-and-Sour Onions (Cipolline in Agrodolce)

Romans have had a taste for sweet and sour since ancient times, when honey, grape must or sweet wine provided the sweet, and vinegar or garum the sour. In traditional Roman cooking, wild boar or beef tongue may be cooked in agrodolce, as are occasionally red mullet and salt cod. These onions, cooked until golden brown and tender, are ubiquitous in Rome during the colder months. This recipe yields piquant onions that nicely complement the simply prepared meats that are so much a part of the Roman menu.
Average Customer Rating:
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Customer Reviews for Sweet-and-Sour Onions (Cipolline in Agrodolce)
Review 1 for Sweet-and-Sour Onions (Cipolline in Agrodolce)
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
RainyDay
,Seattle
,WA
Seattle, WA
June 16, 2012
Ability level:Advanced
Cooks for:1 to 2 people
Cooks:Every day
Would You Recommend? Yes
+5points
5of 5found this review helpful.
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Gorgeous, Deep Flavour
June 16, 2012
These are amazing. The vinegar and sugar played off each other nicely and gave a spectacularly deep flavour. I made this to recipe with the exception of the wine (used vermouth) and the water (used chicken broth instead). I also added a small pinch of citric acid to ensure an extra tangy, bright taste.
I used cipollini onions and cooked them for an hour and they held up perfectly. Next time, however, I might try an additional 10-15 minutes to get them even more tender.
These are perfect as a side dish or condiment, depending on your meal. They also held up well after time in the fridge and reheating.
I definitely recommend these. My only suggestion is that you double the recipe if you have 4 people. If not, double it anyway. After all of that braising, they make delicious leftovers!
Pros: Good Value, Easy, Healthy, Appearance, Impressive, Will Make Again