Pears Poached in White Wine

A vegetable peeler or paring knife is handy for removing long strips of citrus zest. Be careful to remove only the thin, colored layer of the peel, leaving the bitter white pith behind. If some of the pith is attached, you can easily scrape it away with a knife. You can then cut the strips lengthwise to the desired width.
Average Customer Rating:
5 out of 5
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 out of 
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Customer Reviews for Pears Poached in White Wine
Review 1 for Pears Poached in White Wine
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
NCaledon
,OTTAWA
,On
August 5, 2012
Ability level:Advanced
Cooks for:1 to 2 people
Cooks:Every day
Would You Recommend? Yes
+2points
2of 2found this review helpful.
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Very elegant dinner party dessert!
August 5, 2012
I kept the pears whole and cored the bottom half of them with an apple corer and paring knife prior to peeling. I used firm, not-too-ripe sugar pears and Anjou and Bartlett pears are not in season for a couple more weeks. Also, I realized too late that I didn't have an appropriate white wine, but had leftover sparkling white wine. I just stirred it over low heat to remove the carbonation. After poaching and plating the pears on dessert plates, I let the syrup continue to simmer to boil off into a thicker syrup. I made freshly whipped cream to accompany the pears; I added one tablespoon of the syrup to the cream after whipping to a soft peak and then whipped to a firm peak. I sliced fresh market strawberries for garnish. It was a HUGE hit!!
Pros: Easy, Appearance, Impressive, Will Make Again